Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Richard L. Evans on heroic lives of service and love

Elder Richard L. Evans (1906-1971) served as a Seventy from 1938-1953, when he was called to the Quorum of Twelve Apostles.  He died in 1971 at age 65.  He was known as "the voice of the Tabernacle Choir" from the beginning of its broadcasts in 1929 until his passing.
"There are many in this world who live heroically in simple, daily, faithful service—people often unknown; often unnoticed; often discouraged; sometimes tried and tempted; sometimes feeling they must give up, that they can't go on—and yet they do go on, and, against discouragement, do their duty, daily: mothers abandoned, widowed, left with children; fathers left alone—grandmothers—children who care for each other. There are those who have little to live on, little relatively to brighten their lives, and yet do what they can with a loyal sense of duty. There are those who love and cherish and care for impaired children; those who faithfully care for dependent parents; those who care for loved ones who are long ill and dependent upon them; those who provide tender care, who perform essential tasks, with problems and disappointments, under difficult and discouraging conditions—weary hours, inconvenience, extra effort, going without, enduring difficulties.
"And life goes on as well as it does because there are those who do what needs to be done, when it needs to be done, often against difficulty and discouragement. Oh, you who have illness; people dependent upon you—you who stay with loved ones in loyalty—you who are discouraged in your work—you who are disappointed in others, in yourselves, in circumstances—you who feel you have little of the brightness of life—trust; have faith; do the best you can. Don't give up. Don't walk out on life. Don't leave loved ones. There may be a feeling of frustration in doing what you are doing, but there can be a greater frustration in not doing what is yours to do.
"To you who give humble daily, faithful service—often unnoticed, often discouraged, sometimes feeling you can't go on: You can. Others have—and do. Meet the events of each day, and satisfactions will come in ways you do not know. God bless you—and thanks to all of you who give such service."
- Richard L. Evans, "The Spoken Word," October 25, 1970; see Ensign January 1971
Click here to read the full article

I suspect that all of us know individuals "who live heroically in simple, daily, faithful service," often unappreciated, usually unrecognized, and always struggling with increased challenges of life, including "weary hours, inconvenience, extra effort, going without, enduring difficulties." I appreciated Elder Evans' tribute to them. Most mothers fall into this category, to some degree (some, including single mothers or those who care for disabled children, far more than others).

While paying tribute to these faithful servants and care-givers, Elder Evans encourages patient and faithful endurance. And he promises blessings of satisfactions that will come in unexpected ways:



I am grateful for those who have shown this kind of Christlike love to me, and have shown the example of serving others as I've watched.

2 comments:

  1. "To you who give humble daily, faithful service—often unnoticed, often discouraged, sometimes feeling you can't go on: You can. Others have—and do. Meet the events of each day, and satisfactions will come in ways you do not know. God bless you—and thanks to all of you who give such service."
    Great description of my Mother - it's her birthday today - she would be 101 if she can not been hit by a car while crossing a street during her "fast" early morning walk when she was 75. I wish she had been able to hear the fun statement "May the 4th be with you" it would be a good laugh for her - and I think the force was with her.

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